WCSU News

WCSU Art Department to host student ceramics sale Dec. 6 & 7

DANBURY, CONN. — The Western Connecticut State University Department of Art will host a ceramics sale from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday and Friday, Dec. 6 and 7, 2018, in Room 017 of White Hall on the university’s Midtown campus, 181 White St. in Danbury. The public is invited.

Students in the WCSU Department of Art will sell their handmade ceramic craft products. The student artists have produced a variety of functional and non-toxic ceramic wares as part of their course work. Ceramics on sale for holiday gift giving and personal use will include plates, bowls and other pieces that are made with pigmented clays or have been given a glazed finish. Prices for items on sale will generally range from $5 to $25.

Funds raised from the sale will support the Art Department ceramics program. A tour of the new WCSU ceramics studio and information about the ceramics process will be available to visitors during the sale.

For more information, contact Adjunct Professor of Art Jurg Lanzrein at lanzreinj@wcsu.edu.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

Autism advocacy organization cites WCSU program in nation’s Top 50

Action Behavior Centers survey honors online M.S. in Applied Behavior Analysis at WCSU

DANBURY, CONN. — The Western Connecticut State University master’s degree program in applied behavior analysis (ABA) has earned the prestigious recognition by the autism advocacy and treatment organization Action Behavior Centers in its “Top 50 Online ABA Master’s Programs and Certificates in 2018” survey of higher education institutions across the United States.

Action Behavior Centers, a Texas-based organization dedicated to promotion of ABA therapy as a foundation for assessment and treatment of individuals on the autism spectrum, observed that the training of Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) is essential for development of customized treatment plans and supervision of one-on-one therapy sessions. The 2018 survey posted on the organization’s website described the listing as an initiative to provide guidance to students interested in a career as a BCBA in identifying “the top 50 colleges, in no particular order, that offer fully web-based ABA or autism-related programs in the United States.”

“There is a recent and growing need for qualified professionals in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis,” the survey introduction observed. “ABA therapy, the leading treatment for autism spectrum disorder, helps children on the spectrum improve in many areas of development including communication, social skills and day-to-day living skills.”

The survey listing for the WCSU online Master of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis program recognized the university as “an institution dedicated to higher standards of education and research. WCSU provides high-quality behavior analytic instruction to practitioners, earning its online ABA program a spot on this list.”

Action Behavior Centers is directed by a clinical leadership with extensive expertise in the field of ABA therapy, overseeing a staff of BCBAs “whose life work is helping children on the autism spectrum to live rich, happy lives in which they can contribute to the world around them to the fullest,” the organization’s website said. The survey of the nation’s “Top 50 Online ABA Programs” weighed various criteria including academic quality, BCBA examination pass rates, program flexibility and tuition levels in determining the selections. The list places WCSU’s program in the elite company of significantly larger public and private universities nationwide.

The survey marks the latest in a series of honors that have drawn national recognition to the excellence of the ABA master’s program at WCSU. The 2018 Applied Behavior Analysis Programs Guide, released last December, ranked WCSU at No. 1 among higher education institutions nationwide that offer an online master’s degree in applied behavior analysis. The ABA Programs Guide profile of WCSU noted that the university’s fully online instructional program prepares students “to effectively quantify and measure behavior in order to make effective changes that will improve overall behavior of an individual, group or organization.” The guide noted students in the WCSU program learn how to measure behavior, collect and analyze data, and make suitable modifications to increase appropriate behavior and decrease inappropriate behavior.

The ABA program at WCSU also placed 23rd in a nationwide survey released this fall by the education research publisher SR Education Group of the “2019 Most Affordable Master’s Degrees in Psychology Online.” SR Education representative Kelsey D’Ewart said that the recognition reflected a determination that the competitive tuition for the WCSU program ranks the university among the top colleges in the United States that offer fully online degrees in the field of psychology while “making an effort to provide economical options for students.”

The WCSU ABA master’s degree, housed in the Education and Educational Psychology Department, is achieved through completion of a rigorous curriculum of nine courses for a total of 30 credit hours. The M.S. program includes 19 credits of core coursework designed to qualify graduates to sit for the BCBA examination sponsored by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). The WCSU program includes a required course in Assistive Technology for Applied Behavior Analysis, an area of study with important applications in the profession.

For more information, contact the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

Art Department faculty to offer ‘Portfolio Day’ at WCSU Dec. 1

High school and transfer students invited to explore art and design education at WCSU

DANBURY, CONN. — The Western Connecticut State University  Department of Art  will offer an opportunity for students interested in pursuing an education in art and design to have their works reviewed by members of the WCSU art faculty during a “Portfolio Day” event on Saturday, Dec. 1, 2018.

The event will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. in Room 145 of the Visual and Performing Arts Center on the university’s Westside campus, 43 Lake Ave. Extension in Danbury. Participation is encouraged for high school and college transfer students interested in pursuing art studies at WCSU, as well as their parents, teachers and guidance counselors. Admission is free and advance registration is required; reservations may be submitted online at https://wcsuvpac.eventbrite.com.

Participants are invited to bring in selections from their works or a digital portfolio, and will meet individually with professional artists who teach at WCSU. Faculty members will critique portfolios to provide feedback and guidance on works presented and also will be prepared to discuss professional career opportunities in art and design, as well as concentrations for study in the Art Department’s Bachelor of Arts program.

For more information, contact the Department of Art at (203) 837-8403.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

WCSU offers master’s degree in Integrative Biological Diversity

Program offered in collaboration with SCSU and local partners

DANBURY, CONN. — Western Connecticut State University has entered into a collaborative initiative through the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities system to offer a new Master of Science in Integrative Biological Diversity degree.

Coordinated by Professor of Biological and Environmental Sciences Dr. Theodora Pinou, the program establishes a partnership between WCSU and Southern Connecticut State University to provide a 30-credit master’s degree curriculum with courses taught on both campuses. Faculty from the WCSU Biological and Environmental Sciences Department and the SCSU Environment, Geography and Marine Sciences Department participate as course instructors and research mentors. Future plans call for participation by faculty at Eastern Connecticut and Central Connecticut state universities.

The program mission statement sets the goal of bringing together graduate courses and faculty expertise across the CSCU system. Program objectives include the education of students in the use of molecular research methods to assess diversity among organisms and environmental health, and in the use of GIS, GPS and other technological tools to examine, quantify and describe biodiversity. “The Master of Science in Integrative Biological Diversity requires that all students engage in biodiversity monitoring as a component of stewardship, and learn to communicate the importance of diversity to human health and the conservation of resources,” the mission statement said.

An important aspect of the program is the opportunity for M.S. candidates to collaborate with a wide range of corporations, educational institutions, conservation and wildlife organizations and other partners where students can apply their skills and knowledge to real-world experiences in the exploration and monitoring of biodiversity. Among these partners are the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, the Housatonic River Valley Association, the Candlewood Lake Authority, the Norwalk Aquarium, the Atlantic Marine Conservation Society, Connecticut Audubon, FirstLight Power Resources, the Cape Eleuthra Institute, and the Great Hollow Nature Preserve and Ecological Research Center. The program also maintains international collaborative relationships with the University of Guadalajara CUCBA and the University of Athens.

“This program will train the student’s eye to become more sensitive to the natural variations of the biological world,” Pinou remarked. “Biodiversity is important because most technological advances stem from solutions found in the natural world.”

The program mission statement observed that the curriculum, enriched by extensive collaborative research opportunities, will prepare students “for careers in ecosystem management and reclamation, policy and environmental consulting, sustainable business, education and non-government organizations.” The program is also appropriate for secondary education teachers interested in obtaining an advanced degree focusing on the ecological, physiological and natural history of biological organisms.

“For teachers in secondary education, it will help them to inspire their students,” Pinou said. “For biology majors who have focused mostly on the cellular and molecular level during their undergraduate studies, this program will teach them to see how these units, when they come together, can result in adaptability.”

Admission requirements include a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and a GPA average of 3.0 or higher during undergraduate studies. Students currently enrolled in a graduate program in biological, environmental or related fields, as well as social science majors with background in biology or natural sciences, also are encouraged to apply. Detailed information about the M.S. in Integrative Biological Diversity may be obtained from the online WCSU 2018-19 graduate catalog at http://catalogs.wcsu.edu/grad1819/master-of-science-in-integrative-biological-diversity/.

For more information, contact the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

WCSU theatre arts department to stage ‘The Wild Party’

inamge of Kelsey Lepesko, of Stratford, in a scene from “The Wild Party” at WCSU

Kelsey Lepesko, of Stratford, in a scene from “The Wild Party” at WCSU

DANBURY, CONN. — Based on Joseph Moncure March’s 1928 poem, the musical “The Wild Party” will come to the stage at Western Connecticut State University for the first two weekends of November. Presented by the WCSU Department of Theatre Arts, the first round of performances will be at 8 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 9; at 2 and 8 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 10; and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018. The following weekend, performances will be at 8 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 16; at 2 and 8 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17; and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 18, 2018.

“The Wild Party” will take place on the MainStage Theatre of the Visual and Performing Arts Center on the university’s Westside campus, 43 Lake Ave. Extension in Danbury. General admission is $25. To purchase tickets or for more information, visit www.eventbrite.com/e/the-wild-party-tickets-45386445079 or call (203) 837-8732.

“The Wild Party” tells a jazz-age tale of Queenie, a vaudeville dancer, and Burrs, a vaudeville clown, in the wild days of prohibition. Partying through lust and angst in a show charged by a jazz-influenced score, Queenie has to decide what is next for her in this compelling story of the roaring 1920s. According to one critic, “The band is blowing, the hooch is flowing and the guests are lit!”

Tim Howard, coordinator of the university’s Musical Theatre program, will direct “The Wild Party.”

“It’s exhilarating, it’s really rhythmic, it captures the 1920s, it’s dangerous and it’s compelling,” Howard said. “It’s a wild party. I’m thrilled to introduce our Connecticut audiences to this lesser-known, but thrilling musical. It has an exhilarating and extremely tuneful score.”

Howard described his casting process as something that hinged on who would bring the most truth to the show, which represents the peak of the 1920s: living life on the edge, love triangles and unraveling surprises.

“This is one of the most theatrical and thought-provoking pieces I’ve directed in my career,” he said. “The artistic team is first rate and the cast is superb. The singing, dancing and acting will knock you out! This is not to be missed.”

The cast includes Kelsey Lepesko, of Stratford, as Queenie; Sergio Francisco Mandujano, of Norwalk, as Burrs; Isiah Bostic, of Hamden, as Black; Sasha Renae Brown, of Middletown, as Kate; Alaina Mueller, of Windsor, as Madelaine True; Mark Sumner, of Middletown, as Eddie; Brandon Richardi, of Boston, Massachusetts, as Jackie; Thomas Bergamo, of Wolcott, as Oscar; Mike Katz, of Monroe, as Phil/Dance Captain; Kayla Hansen, of West Haven, as Dolores; Joelle Tshudy, of Belvidere, New Jersey, as Mae; and Grace McGovern, of North Haven, as Nadine.

The crew includes Director Howard, Choreographer Elizabeth Parkinson, Music Director David Baranowski, Producer Pam McDaniel, Production Manager Tom Swetz, Lighting Designer Scott Cally, Costume Designer Sharon Sobel and Scenic Designer Elizabeth Popiel.

In recent years, Howard’s direction and reimagining of “Evita” received 10 National Awards from the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF) and in 2016 Howard’s production of “Parade” received 14 national KCACTF awards followed by 11 national awards for his production of “The Drowsy Chaperone” in 2017All three musicals received outstanding production of a musical and Outstanding Director of a musical.

For more information, contact the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

WCSU professor’s research shows hope for veterans to heal through community dance program

image of Dancing Well program

Dancing Well program (Photo credit: John Nation)

DANBURY, CONN. — In what might seem like an unlikely partnership, Western Connecticut State University Professor of Psychology Dr. Robin Gustafson and Louisville, Kentucky, dance instructor Deborah Denenfeld have partnered to conduct research on how community dance programs can aid veterans with PTSD and Brain Injury. Gustafson and Denenfeld met through their joint interest in contra dancing several summers ago.

Gustafson used her expertise in research methods, as well as her background in the ecological and embodied cognitive science, to conduct research on the effects of a community dance program called Dancing Well: The Soldier Project. Prior research had shown that community dance can have a significant impact on brain areas involved in stress and PTSD.

During Gustafson and Denenfeld’s research, three (now former) WCSU students, Carlos Jiminez, Marlon Tristao (also a veteran) and Tyla Johnson, worked with Gustafson on designing the assessment, writing, data coding, data entry and data analysis. The team completed its final draft of the paper during the summer of 2018 and it is currently under review for publication. Co-author Dr. Cynthia Corbitt from the University of Louisville also helped Denenfeld with on-site work.

Before and after each 10-week community dance program, 17 veterans and accompanying family members were measured on connectedness, experience avoidance, hope and optimism. The Dancing Well program consisted of weekly 90-minute community dances with live music and calling by Denenfeld, a nationally recognized dance caller. Gustafson found significant improvements in all three wellness measures, which was a surprising outcome given the small sample size. More surprisingly, the improvements were significant for all participants, regardless of PTSD status, showing that even the family members were healing. Gustafson and her co-authors believe that these results show that this program, and programs like it, can help treat some of the most important non-medical symptoms of PTSD in veterans and some of the often-overlooked problems experienced by their families.

The nonprofit, Dancing Well, started when staff psychiatrist Edwin O. Walker invited Denenfeld, a seasoned dancer, dance instructor and dance caller, to the VA Healthcare Center at Fort Knox, Kentucky. They worked together to develop and implement a dance series specifically attuned to the needs of soldiers with PTSD and/or BI.

Walker had seen firsthand the devastating effects of PTSD and BI, both on his patients and on the families, friends and loved ones who welcomed them home. He saw how the combination of pain, impaired memory and anxiety around others could cripple veterans in the rest of their lives and take a heavy toll on couples and families.

“I would be really short-sighted to think that mere words will convey how much this has helped the different soldiers that I have seen later in my office,” Walker said.

Not only did the soldiers and families love the dancing, they reported measurable outcomes. At the end of the series, every soldier who participated reported reduced anxiety, better physical health and an improved outlook on the future. Ninety percent also said that their memory and mood had improved. Half also reported a decrease in physical pain. They also reported feeling less isolated and that their relationships with family, friends and others had improved. These benefits were consistent in surveys given immediately following the series and three months later.

“I formed the organization because I had experienced the healing power of community dance myself,” now-Executive Director Denenfeld said. “Many people have told me about how going to a dance lifts their mood, helps them feel connected with others, and provides a social community they come to value.”

Based on steady attendance and a tremendous response from participants, Dancing Well now holds several dance series of 10 sessions each per year in Louisville.

According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, PTSD afflicts one in five Iraqi war veterans, 11 percent of veterans of the war in Afghanistan, as many as 10 percent of Gulf War veterans, and nearly one-third of Vietnam veterans. Since 2000, there has been a steep rise in the number of veterans on disability for PTSD. Today, one in three veterans treated by the VA suffers from PTSD.

For more information, send an email to gustafsonr@wcsu.edu.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

WCSU to honor veterans with November events

DANBURY, CONN. — Western Connecticut State University will host and participate in a number of events intended to honor veterans this month during Military Appreciation Week 2018.

On Monday, Nov. 5, the WCSU Office of Veterans Affairs will host “The 22 Push-Up Challenge” at noon at the Student Center on the university’s Midtown campus, 181 White St. in Danbury.

Wednesday, Nov. 7, will feature an Obstacle Course Challenge from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the lawn of Fairfield Hall on the Midtown campus, and the Danbury Exchange Club Dinner at 6:15 p.m. at Anthony’s Lake Club, 10 Christopher Columbus Ave. in Danbury.

On Thursday, Nov. 8, WCSU will host a screening of “Major ‘Doc’ Brown” at 5:30 p.m. in Room 127 of White Hall on the Midtown campus. Albert “Doc” Brown was the oldest survivor of the Bataan Death March in the Philippines during World War II. The film was produced, directed and edited by WCSU Professor of Communication and Media Arts Dr. JC Barone.

The Danbury Vet Center will host a U.S. Marine Corps Birthday Celebration at noon on Friday, Nov. 9, at the center, 457 North Main St. in Danbury.

WCSU will honor veterans with a Veterans Day Ceremony at 11 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 12. The ceremony, in Ives Concert Hall in White Hall on the Midtown campus, will honor current and former service members.

All events are open to the public. Some off-campus events may involve a fee to participate. For more information, send an email to kuchtam@wcsu.edu.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

WCSU to host day of celebration for first-generation students

DANBURY, CONN. — Western Connecticut State University will host “I’m First,” a celebration of first-generation college students, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at the Alumni and Friends Circle on the university’s Midtown campus, 181 White St. in Danbury.

Light snacks and beverages will be offered. This is a free and public event, where traditional and nontraditional students, faculty and administrators will have the opportunity to share their own personal experiences as a first-generation college student and the impact that experience has had on their lives.

WCSU will join in celebration with other colleges across the nation that are engaged in a number of different activities to highlight first-generation students on campus. The concept of a “first-generation” student was introduced into federal policy by the passage of Higher Education Amendments to the Higher Education Act of 1965.

As a result of this amendment, the WCSU community has the opportunity to celebrate those who have made huge strides in this country to be the first in their family to attend college. College-preparatory programs like those offered at WCSU recognize that too many qualified students miss out on college simply due to a lack of access to adequate college guidance and information.

Pre-Collegiate & Access Programs at WCSU include Danbury Public Schools Collaborative/Upward Bound, Excel and EA²P (Educational Achievement and Access Program. Director of these programs Rob Pote is an advocate for and believer in the power of education.

“Having a college degree makes a difference to more than just the person with the diploma,” he said. “It inspires others.”

The Collaborative/Upward Bound Program is a year-round, college preparatory program serving approximately 110 Danbury High School students from grades 9 through 12. The Excel Program is a middle school (Broadview, Rogers Park and Westside Academy) feeder program for the Danbury Public Schools Collaborative/Upward Bound Program, currently serving 90 students in grades 7 and 8, while the WCSU EA²P Program is a year-round academic enhancement program serving underprivileged college students.

This event will also offer “I’M FIRST” long-sleeve shirts, buttons, pins and stickers for attendees.

For more information, contact Pote at poter@wcsu.edu.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

WCSU Health Promotion Studies program earns national accreditation

Bachelor’s degree curriculum meets rigorous CEPH standards

DANBURY, CONN. — The Health Promotion Studies bachelor’s degree program at Western Connecticut State University has received the prestigious accreditation of the Council on Education for Public Health affirming that the undergraduate curriculum meets the rigorous academic standards required for the CEPH seal of approval.

The council, an independent agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education to accredit schools of public health nationwide, recently informed WCSU President Dr. John Clark and Department of Health Promotion and Exercise Sciences (HPX) Chair Dr. Robyn Housemann that the demanding three-year review process by CEPH has concluded successfully with the CEPH Board of Councilors vote on Sept. 7, 2018,  to award accreditation to the Bachelor of Science in Health Promotion Studies program at WCSU. CEPH President Dr. Rose Marie Martinez indicated that the decision established an initial accreditation date retroactive to Oct. 24, 2015, and has been granted for a five-year period going forward to Dec. 31, 2023.

The CEPH requested an interim report due by July 2019 to confirm WCSU compliance with accreditation stipulations for adjunct faculty participation in department decision-making and curriculum development and for completion of a program mission statement. Housemann noted that the department has taken action this year to meet these conditions.

The HPX Department’s undergraduate curriculum in Health Promotion Studies offers four options for concentration including community health, wellness management, holistic and integrative health, and allied health professions. Completion of the bachelor’s degree program prepares HPX graduates to sit for the Certified Health Education Specialist examination, the nationally recognized credential for health educators.

Housemann observed that the accreditation application initiated in summer 2015 required the HPX Department to engage in extensive data collection, curriculum review and self-study. She devoted many hours along with HPX Associate Chair Dr. Emily Stevens to prepare and write several report drafts and responses that were required to complete the lengthy CEPH review process. A CEPH team of reviewers from the public health profession and academia visited WCSU this spring for comprehensive interviews with administrators, faculty, students, alumni and community representatives, and the team’s positive evaluation cleared the way for the accreditation approval in September.

Building on HPX efforts over the past decade to emphasize an experiential and service learning approach, the accreditation process helped department faculty to reevaluate the curriculum and introduce further restructuring where needed, Housemann noted.

“There is value in taking a really good look at your courses and your program to determine what the learning outcomes are, and whether we are achieving our goals,” she said. “Our goal is to prepare our students well with the skills they need for the job market. We have been able to view our program from a different perspective and see whether we are providing the greatest benefit to our students.”

Dr. Barry Eckert, interim dean of the WCSU School of Professional Studies, which houses the HPX Department, observed that the Association of Specialized and Professional Accreditors describes accreditation as “a mark of distinction for academic programs and institutions, signaling high quality and a commitment to excellence.”

“I am very proud of the work that the Department of Health Promotion and Exercise Sciences has done in developing the program in Health Promotion Studies,” Eckert said. “CEPH has recognized the quality of this program by granting accreditation. Ultimately, our students benefit from this recognition.”

A cornerstone of the Health Promotion Studies curriculum is the service learning project, which challenges students to develop, implement and assess health promotion programs for university and community organizations. This project spans four semesters’ work in five HPS core courses that are designed to teach skills in assessment, theory, program planning and design, and program evaluation. The HPS capstone experience is a semester-long, 450-hour internship where students apply the skills and knowledge they have acquired in a workplace setting in the community.

The accreditation process provided impetus for curriculum adjustments and introduction of new courses in several areas including health communications and marketing, health care policy, mental health, human sexuality and wellness management. A course providing an introduction to health promotion and public health was created for freshman and transfer students to help them in determining whether the Health Promotion Studies major suits their interests.

Curriculum restructuring has proceeded in tandem with measures taken during the accreditation process to establish more rigorous academic standards for HPS enrollment and graduation. Candidates for the B.S. in Health Promotion Studies now must maintain a C-plus average to remain in the program and must attain a GPA of 2.5 or higher to graduate.

Housemann said that the combined impact of curriculum restructuring and tightened academic standards has benefited students and enhanced the attractiveness of pursuing the Health Promotion Studies degree at WCSU. During the past decade, enrollment in the department has increased approximately fourfold to more than 200 students this year — and thanks to the CEPH decision, HPS students can claim the prestige of graduating from an accredited program in their field.

“This accreditation means that any student who has graduated from our program from 2015 onward has graduated not only from an accredited university, but also from an accredited Health Promotion Studies program,” Housemann remarked. “We have done a lot of work, a lot of research and self-study to reach this accomplishment.

“Students will see the benefits of going to an accredited institution when they apply for a job or seek admission to graduate school,” she said. “And it will help our recruitment of new students for the program in state and across the nation. It gives us validation that we are doing what we need to do to prepare our graduates well.”

For more information, contact the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

WCSU women’s basketball team to fundraise with ‘Tip-Off Breakfast’

DANBURY, CONN. — The Western Connecticut State University women’s basketball team will host a Tip-Off Breakfast from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018, in the Ballroom of the Campus Center on the university’s Westside campus, 43 Lake Ave. Extension in Danbury. The public is invited and while there is no admission fee, guests will be encouraged to make “tip” donations.

This is the annual fundraiser for the women’s team, which belongs to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division III and whose players are members of the Little East Conference. In addition, both the WCSU men’s and women’s athletic programs hold membership in the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC).

In the 2017-18 season, WCSU Women’s basketball played 26 games, averaged 86 points, about 47 rebounds, and 15 assists per game. The first game of the 2018-19 season is at Elms College on Saturday, Oct. 27, and the Colonials’ last game of the season is against Southern Maine on Saturday, Feb. 16, 2019. View the full schedule at www.westconnathletics.com/sports/wbkb/2018-19/schedule.

The roster includes freshman Frances Snyder, of Pine Plains, New York; sophomore Jessica Davis, of Hamden; sophomore Gabrielle Hurlbert, of Thomaston; freshman Asiah Knight, of Norwalk; junior Tashai Price, of Vernon; sophomore Genesis Torres, of Stratford; junior Jancy Sherwood, of Poughquag, New York; and freshman Sydney Gouveia, of New Fairfield.

Recent years have seen Western’s teams qualify for post-season NCAA National Championships in women’s soccer (13), women’s basketball (12), softball (11), men’s basketball (10), men’s soccer (nine), women’s volleyball (six), football (1985, 1999 and 2001) and baseball (in 2002).

To make reservations or for more information, call Head Coach Kim Rybczyk at (203) 837-9018.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.